Author Archives: Melissa

Snapshots from the Sisters: Advent Edition

Advent and Incarnation Blessings! We are so blessed at this time of the year with the prayerful presence of so many friends, families, and volunteers, as we go about our Merry-Christmas-Peace-making-Prayer, that remind us of the journey to Christ’s birth and God among us.

Advent at the Monastery. Anna and Laura Presents

Photo #2: Anna and Laura Dourgarian dropping off Christmas presents from the staff at TempWorks Software. (Two friends from countless organizations and community networks that generously donate to our community at this time of year.)

Here are a couple photos highlighting our Advent to date. We invite you to write a creative caption for any of these photos below in our comment section.

 

Advent Christmas Cookies with SS

Photo #1: Sr. Suzanne Making Christmas Cookies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christmas Prayer and Santa Party

Photo#3: Sr. Karen leading prayer in the chapel at the Christmas prayer and Santa Party.

 

Christmas Story Vis Seniors

Photo #4: Vis School Seniors read from the Christmas story as Sr. Katherine and children look on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***Visit our Facebook page and Flickr albums for more pics from this season.

Seeing Love: Incarnation Contemplations

by Melissa Borgmann-KiemdeVisitation Companion

The following post appears at “Adding to the Beauty” — as part of the “Tireless Hope” Series for Advent: inviting voices of Midwest writers to join the conversation around beauty as it is documented and posted in the Middle East by travelers Becca and Andrew Ulasich.

Adding to Beauty. Winter Tree“Advent [that is to say, the Incarnation] makes us look for God in all those places we have, until now, ignored.” – Joan Chittister

Fr. Dale Korogi opened a recent homily at the Visitation Sisters’ monastery with a paraphrase of Sr. Joan Chittister’s words:

“It’s safe to say that the Visitation Sisters are an Advent community, inviting us to find God in places we have often ignored; places like Fremont and Girard Avenue in North Minneapolis.”

I’d say the same is true regarding Becca and Andrew Ulasich — Northside community members traveling and volunteering around the world. They are an Advent couple on a mission: inviting us to find God in places we have, until now, perhaps ignored; places like Sari Bari in Kolkata; a Himalayan Mountain boarding-school in Northern India, and Poor Servants of Jesus the Master in Nepal. This Advent, they journey through the Holy Land, tuning into stories of Israelis and Palestinians; holding open their hearts, seeking beauty at every turn.

As I sit to write this post, I consider it a gift to be invited to Add to the Beauty in this Advent Series: Middle East meets Midwest.

Inherent in this invitation to compose a blog, is a similar invitation inherent in the season of Advent — and echoed by Joan Chittister’s words. I ask: How is the incarnation manifesting in places I’ve ignored? What are the dark spaces I sidestep or scurry by in my world? In my own psyche or spirit? What headlines do I prefer to scan over — or news posts do I elect to tune out in my Twitter or Facebook feeds in a conscious or unconscious manner? How can Advent help transform my perspective — my heart, my mind, and way of living and loving?”

The incarnation, God taking on human form, means that I am inextricably woven into the story of Love.

I began writing this blog on Thanksgiving morning. Tucked into a cozy room of my parent’s lakeside home nestled in the wooded landscape along the Lewis and Clark Reservoir along the Missouri Riverbanks that form the border between Nebraska and South Dakota. I recognized my geographical location in an area called Hideaway Acres” as keenly appropriate; and I wondered, “What is hidden in my own heart that God is asking me to shine a light on?”

The past four weeks leading up to the start of Advent have been chock full of large events that give way for my pause and incarnation contemplations:

–My baby sister got married;

–My husband donated a kidney to his older sister;

–We had an opportunity to embrace new family members from Burkina Faso, West Africa;

–We were embraced by family members who reside in a care facility devoted to their mental health in Northeast Nebraska;

–Two of our best friends were married in a ceremony uniting their Puerto Rican and Polish-American families, after my husband and I introduced them.

The incarnation, God taking on human form, means that I am inextricably woven into the story of Love. At every turn, I have an opportunity to marvel at the mystery of my connection to every other creature on this planet, and to see beauty, goodness, hope. I am given the opportunity to bow down in awe at the workings of our marvelous Creator. The Creator of my and my husband’s siblings and all of our blessed organs. I can stand in awe at the recent immigration narratives of my nieces from Burkina Faso as I marvel the healing journeys of two uncles who battle addiction and mark life as formerly homeless. I am prostrate to Love as it is born out in the marriage of two who never entertained this kind of happy union for themselves.

As we journey together this Advent, what unites us in our contemplations of the incarnation? What ignored spaces of life does God invite each of us to see?

Blessings!

On being still: Placing our worries at the feet of Jesus — and other prayerful stances

What prayerful stance am I called to?

What prayerful stance are you called to enact?

by Melissa Borgmann-KiemdeVisitation Companion

I like the idea of God and I pressing our foreheads together. I lean in, Love leans closer. My eyes gaze down, and the Good Lord’s radiance heats up my head, in a way that makes me tingle all over. I’m delightfully still, not having to move backward or forward, but simply be in that intimate, physically real and imagined, posture of prayer.

Sometimes, when I sit to pray,  I close my eyes, and imagine traveling all the way out in the galaxy, to sit airily on one of Saturn’s rings taking in this glorious universe that God has made. I’m small and simultaneously in perfect awe of all that God has brought into being. I take a deep breathe, recognizing that this moment is comprised of eons of love and intention in order to be, and I feel held, and precious in the whole of my life circumstances.

Other times when I sit, I go with a recent experience in life — one where I have felt love and delight in God’s presence. Like this morning, when my 4 year old daughter said: “Mom, let’s play that game where I run by you and you grab me and say, ‘I’m never going to let you go.'” I’m complicit in this ongoing game of ours, and in following her lead, I realize that I may be enacting a similar game or request with God. As I reach out, embrace my wriggling 4 year old, and entertain squeals of delight enveloping her as a  precious child, I feel God doing a similar thing with me. “I’m never going to let you go” He whispers, and sounds a lot like me.

My typical “go-to” stance in Centering Prayer is this: laying everything at the feet of Jesus. I show up in my chair, chant the morning Psalm in the best way I know how, and then ask for the grace to sit still for the next twenty minutes. I breathe in and out deeply and am, more often than not, ecstatic to arrive in the chair and not have to solve one thing, make a next decision, or be “perfect” in any way shape or form. I just have to show up. And as I “show up” in my chair, I consciously try to lay down any thought or anxiety or recent drama that manages to worm its way forward in my consciousness. “Here you go, Jesus!” I say in my mind, and imagine  literally placing the worry at the toes, heels and ankles of God.

When my good friend  Karen and I reflect aloud about our prayer lives and attempts at faithful living, we often giggle. And this phrase and stance: “Put it at the feet of Jesus” is a delightful reminder and invitation to surrender and trust in God’s love and mercy for all aspects of our lives.

***

As we make our way through this season of holiday prep and gratitude making, I invite you to consider your own prayer life. How are you positioning yourself? Where do you find stillness? What do you imagine Love inviting you to do? What do you want or need to place at the foot of the cross?

Q & A with Brenda Lisenby: Monastic Immersion Experience Resident

Welcome Brenda Lisenby!

Welcome Brenda Lisenby!

On Wednesday, October 29, 2014, the Visitation Sisters of Minneapolis welcomed Brenda Lisenby in an intimate commissioning ceremony as the community’s latest Monastic Immersion Experience resident. On the heels of this event, Companion Melissa Borgmann-Kiemde had an opportunity to interview Ms. Lisenby via emailed questions and answers. That Q & A follows. Let’s warmly welcome the latest addition to our Salesian family! 

Q: What’s your full name?

A: Brenda Ellen Lisenby

Q: Where were you born?

A: Beaumont, Texas

Q: How did you come to be immersed in the monastic life of the Visitation Sisters of Minneapolis?

A: The short version is, “It was just the next thing!”
The journey to this place has been an interesting one where I have mis-taken detours for my destination, and my destinations for detours. But pilgrimage often includes a time of losing one’s way and finding it—and I see life as a pilgrimage to know and love God, self, and others (Mark 12:30-31). So I arrive at Visitation Monastery as a place along the way in my pilgrimage of life and learning to love.

Q: How does a Baptist missionary in Hong Kong come to a Roman Catholic monastery in north Minneapolis?

A: As I read your question, for some reason I am reminded of Mary’s exclamation of “How can this be?” when the angel announced to news of her pregnancy! Mary’s question is often my question and always alerts me to the work of the Holy Spirit… “this” can only be by the Holy Spirit. The Spirit has graciously accompanied me along the way, often through very practical, everyday things that I needed to tend to such as changes in ministry, burnout, depression, and physical illness.

Q: What is the Holy Spirit whispering to you these days? Take us into the heart of your listening journey,  if you will, and what you are noting that’s inspiring your present walk with God.

A: As I tend to the daily, I realize I am learning to walk with God in a new way. I can and do make decisions and plans, but I am learning to trust what follows as the unfolding will of God. In short, I am learning to “listen” to my life. I once read that listening to one’s life is a form of prayer and this idea has stayed with me and born fruit.

Q: What excites you about religious sisters and monastic communities in this day and age?

A: I am excited to see traditional monastic communities tackle the tough questions about how to live their prophetic life form in the 21st  century. The Visitation Monastery in North Minneapolis is only one example of communities experimenting with “new” forms of monasticism. The “new monastic” movement is another. It is interesting to see the traditional understanding about what it means to be “monastic” challenged and see what emerges that is identified as the “essence” of monasticism in this evolving life form.

“How can this be?”…I am thinking that monastic communities of the 21st century will bear little resemblance to the monastic communities of Christendom. Even traditional apostolic communities are looking for new ways to be community and finding new ways of belonging that opens the doors for a more ecumenical inclusiveness.

A friend and I have joked about the new “monapostolic” approach to religious life and emerging faith communities that integrates the values of monasticism (stability and balance) with the values of apostolic communities (ministry, social action). It is exciting to see the things stereotypically associated with monasteries (prayer, contemplation) come into one with the things stereotypically associated with apostolic groups (action)…contemplation and action are no longer seen as separate roles, but are coming together to form a complete whole, in individuals and in communities, that is being present in a new and dynamic way in this day and age. Perhaps the Spirit is bringing forth new wineskins for new wine!

Q: What do you hope to gain from your time with the Visitation Sisters?

A: During my time with the Vis sisters, I hope to deepen my own integration of contemplative prayer and daily action, learning love and humility within the monastic community and the circle of communities that surround them. I also want to learn more about Salesian spirituality—what little I have studied resonates deeply with my own understanding of the spiritual journey.

Q: Who is your favorite saint?

A: At present, my favorite saint is Hildegard. Her personal story fascinates me—a cloistered, hidden nun until the age of 40, when she became leader of her community and began sharing her experience of God. She related to God as her Living Light and articulated her understanding of the life force that animates all creation as viriditas or the “greening power”, that is God present in all creation.

Q: What prayer practice or practices are at the center of your spiritual life?

A: I tend to have eclectic prayer practices. But at present, the primary ones are daily community prayer and faith sharing with the sisters, centering prayer, gentle yoga that I like to think of as “body prayer”, and spiritual reading (lectio).

Q: What ice cream best describes you?

A: I like things plain and simple—vanilla is my favorite, and probably best describes me.

Q: What is your favorite tea or beverage?

A: I like oolong tea and vanilla malts.

Q: What are you currently reading?

A: I am currently reading “Letters of Spiritual Direction” and “Introduction to the Devout Life”…to begin my studies of Salesian spirituality and learn more about Francis and Jane. I also read a daily selection from “Fragments of your Ancient Name: 365 Names for the Divine” by Joyce Rupp (here is a reading by her from her book )

Q: What most surprises you about north Minneapolis?

A: I am surprised that it doesn’t feel like “big city” to me. I have mostly lived in highrise or condo apartments in large cities for the past 15 years so I like living in a neighborhood of houses with little traffic. I often am greeted by people as I walk.

Q: You are acquainted with the Rule of Benedict especially given your time with the Holy Wisdom community in Wisconsin. How does the RB anchor or influence your practice of Salesian Spirituality and Visitation life?

A: The first word of the RB is “Listen!” That is a word I take seriously—listening in all its forms: listening to my own life, listening to others, listening to my body, listening for the movement of the Spirit. Benedict also has given me an appreciation of the idea that our “work” is prayer and while for Benedict that means the daily office, I have taken an expanded view that all of life is a prayer. For Benedict, it was also important to have a balance, and I have learned about the idea of “holy leisure”, keeping attentive to the Spirit and present to the moment. By practicing holy leisure, I have found balance in my life. I take all of this with me as I come to my study of Salesian spirituality and find it provides a wonderful foundation. I resonate deeply with the Salesian values and am excited to see how well they fit as I integrate Francis and Jane with Benedict.

A Ministry of Warmth

12 year old Cemya enjoying the fire

12 year old Cemya enjoying the fire

by Melissa Borgmann-KiemdeVisitation Companion

I imagine his hands. The gloved fingers wielding a chain saw that rattles and buzzes as a pine tree is leveled in the acreage outside his homestead. In my mind’s eye, I see the ax or mechanical splitter that he operates, separating the logs into firewood.

I can see her hands complicit in the intricate dance that is knitting choreography: moving her fingers and guiding needles that move wool strands – back and forth. Knit one, pearl two, in the creation of a warm, winter hat or scarf.

“Christ has no body but yours,
No hands, no feet on earth but yours…
Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good,
Yours are the hands, with which he blesses all the world.”
– 
Teresa of Avila (1515–1582)

We have an unspoken ministry that is part of our presence in north Minneapolis. It is a ministry of warmth — of fire, of gloves and hats and coats that, in our deepest hearts, extends God’s love and care to each of our northside friends and neighbors. It is a literal ministry that has grown organically from our prayer and presence in the heart of the city; one that invites each of us into deeper union and fellowship with one another, by virtue of tending to the temperature.

When the cold sets in, you may find Sr. Mary Margaret or Sr. Katherine at the hearth’s edge, stacking logs in the Fremont House living room fireplace, placing kindling in precise igniting points under the wood. Later, you may stumble upon any one of the Sisters poking the burning timber, stoking the fire to keep the living area bright and warm.

Christ’s hands: Vince Waldock delivers firewood to Monastery porch

Twenty five years ago, when our founding Sisters first arrived in north Minneapolis, they began these cold weather rituals. Living their Visitation charism, they invited those knocking at the door to come inside– to be their guest before the fire. Not unlike extending a glass of cold water in the summer’s heat, extending a seat by the fire in the monastery living room became a practice of their monastic hospitality and Salesian ministry in the winter.

Joe Neumier was tuned in to a Channel 4 news story about the Visitation Sisters’ ministry to children some twenty years ago, and was inspired seeing a child happy and warm sitting next to the Sisters’ living room hearth. He decided to send a truck load of firewood to the northside nuns. This Visitation friend was moved to contribute in this small way to the winter warmth ministry and presence of the Visitandines.

Sitting in the chapel last Saturday morning for prayer, I heard the sound of repetitive footsteps on the front porch of Fremont followed by an exclamation from S. Mary Frances: “The firewood is here!”

Punctuating our prayer was this delightful tale of how the firewood began to be delivered by Vince Waldock and Lawrence James — “Mr. Neumier’s firewood men from Little Falls.”

Pointing to the laborers, S. Mary Frances’ said, “This is just an example of the behind-the-scenes folks that make our lives so warm and inviting.” In addition, of course, we have the countless Visitation friends who provide warm coats and those knitting hats and scarves for our winter clothing give-away.

With Sister’s words, my imagination and prayer has taken off to visualize how intricate this web of charitable giving and heart-felt labor occurs.

Where do your hands take you? What ways do you work to make your community warmer? How is Love’s presence revealed through your small action this day? To echo Teresa of Avila: how are you Christ’s hands and feet?

LIVE + JESUS!

 

Commissioning Cody — Visitation Volunteer Intern Commitment and Blessing Ceremony

by Melissa Borgmann-KiemdeVisitation Companion

Welcome VIP Cody! Photo by Brian Mogren

Welcome VIP Cody! Photo by Brian Mogren

One of the first things you might notice about Cody Maynus is his quick wit; the second is his penchant for all things gracious and hospitable. As a new member of our Visitation Community, we are so fortunate to have this fine fellow among us for this next year serving as a Visitation Volunteer Intern.

“I commit myself to be a stable presence, to practice hospitality, to honor holy flexibility, to “Live+Jesus!” in the northside.”

A month ago, we welcomed Cody formally to our lay community in a commissioning ceremony at Girard House, followed by a blessing of his new digs at Alafia Place with intentional community member, friend, flatmate, and northside minister: Heidi Schleif. What follows is Cody’s Commitment Statement, along with a link to “Welcome New VIP: Cody Maynus!” a photo album of the evening’s events.

We invite you to follow Cody as he makes his way on the northside — exploring Salesian Spirituality; living a life of prayer and service among the northside Sisters and friends; and weaving together his gifts of service, humor, wit, and words with his giant mystical heart.

Please keep him in your prayers, eh?

Live + Jesus!

S. Mary Frances and Cody

Commitment Statement,
by Cody E Maynus:

“In the strong name of the Father, and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen.

In the presence of Almighty God, my family and friends and these Sisters of the Visitation, I commit myself

  • to be a stable presence — grounding myself firmly in the north side of Minneapolis, locating myself gently between Word and Sacrament, surrounding myself with community, and rooting myself to the life of this monastery;

Cody in Vis Community

  • to practice hospitality – loving the Christ in every person whom I encounter, even and especially those most difficult to love;
  • to honor holy flexibility — allowing the Spirit of God the room to upset my plans and preconceptions; and
  • to “Live Jesus” in the northside — to cultivate the virtues of Salesian spirituality: patience, simplicity, gentleness, interiority, joy and hope.

I will endeavor to do these things relying on the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, St. Elizabeth, St. Jane, St. Francis, St. Hildegard, and the whole company of saints in light.”

Signed: Cody E Maynus, Sr. Mary Frances Reis
September 12, 2014.

See photos of the Commissioning and House Blessing at: “Welcome New VIP: Cody Maynus!” a Flickr photo album.
Follow Cody at his blog: Come, Oh Thou Travellor Unknown
To read more about Cody, see his About page Bio.


An Open Letter to the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales’ Novices

Oblates and Sr. Karen.  Top, L-R: Joe, Craig, Jordan, Chris, Jim; Seated, L-R: Joe, S. Karen, Fr. Mike

Oblates and Sr. Karen at St. Jane House
Top, L-R: Joe, Craig, Jordan, Chris, Jim; Seated, L-R: Joe, S. Karen, Fr. Mike

Dear Novices of the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales,*

We love you.

On behalf of the Visitation Community, I extend gratitude for your visit and spirited presence among us for the week celebrating our 25th Anniversary in north Minneapolis. We are so lucky that Fr. Mike Newman, OSFS, was able to come for a week and tote all of you along! What a director you have for your novitiate! St. Jane House experienced a new level of Salesian presence with all of you in residence.

I try to imagine our founders, St. Jane de Chantal and St. Francis de Sales, moving about in the week of your visit; their smiles, laughter, sighs, and joy with our time together. Can you see this?

You are welcome back anytime. In the meantime, you remain in our prayers as you make your way through your novitiate year. We hold Fr. Mike, especially, in his role as Novice Master. Blessings as you pursue the vocation to “Be who we are and be that well!” as St. Francis de Sales counseled.

LIVE+JESUS!

Melissa Borgmann-Kiemde, Visitation Companion

 

*For more on the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales, visit their website.
**To see more photos of the Oblates’ visit to the Twin Cities, visit our Flickr Album, “Oblates Among Us”.

 

Giving Thanks for 25 Years

"We the church of the People of God -- need to be standing in the near north." --Archbishop Roach, October 2, 1989

“We the church of the People of God — need to be standing in the near north.” –Archbishop Roach, October 2, 1989

So we had a party. Or rather, a WEEK of parties: merry-making, reflecting, celebrating, giving thanks, and marking our call to found a monastic community in the heart of north Minneapolis twenty-five years ago. From Monday to Sunday, our Salesian friends, family, neighbors, collaborators, and benefactors descended on our little corner of the northside, and together, we gave thanks for one another, and the Spirit at work in all of our lives calling us to “LIVE + JESUS!”

Week Overview:

  • Monday 9/29: Brenda Lisenby arrived for Monastic Immersion Experience. Oblates of St. Francis de Sales, Fr. Mike Newman, and six novices arrived to spend the week, staying at St. Jane House. 
  • Tuesday 9/30: Fr. Mike and the guys spent the day with us, hearing our history and doing service around the monastery.
  • Wednesday 10/1:  Sr. Mary Mao returned from New York.  The novices spent the entire day at Visitation School and Convent in Mendota.
  • Thursday, 10/2:  Foundation Day — Liturgy of Hours, Mass, Festive luncheon with representatives from each of our monasteries (Georgetown, Brooklyn, St. Louis) and Mendota Heights Visitation school, our Companions, Intern and the Oblates.
  • Friday, 10/3:   The novices and Fr. Mike joined us for Morning Prayer, meals, Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and Mass.
  • Saturday, 10/4 the BIG DAY: Celebration at Capri Theater with emcee Fr. Michael O’Connell, a slideshow by former Vis Neighbor, Jenny Larson,  and keynote by Fr. Mike Newman; dancers from Lundstrum Center of Performing Arts; followed by an intimate pizza party at Girard and Brother Mickey presenting us with a new painting. The Novices and Mike joined us for Morning Prayer/Communion Service and were on deck the entire day to help in countless ways. 
  • Sunday, 10/5: Church of the Ascension went all out to celebrate us!  Mass, gifts, reception.The Novices prepared our evening meal and farewell party/prayer; and the Sisters shared vocation stories with the novices in their own discernment. 

For those unable to be physically present with us, we invite you to visit any of the above links to photos of our guests, and video of our speakers, story-sharing, and reflecting. We are grateful for the work of so many hands, and the faith that has brought us to this moment. We don’t stand alone.

Cheers!

If the above links are too much to navigate, you can view documentation at:

LIVE + JESUS!

Celebrating our 25th Anniversary in the Heart of north Minneapolis

Today, the Feast of Guardian Angels, we mark our 25th year as a monastic community in the heart of north Minneapolis. The following history and images come from our archives, and are accompanied by pictures snapped at today’s Foundation Day mass.

25th Anniversary Mass

Foundation Day Mass 2014: A panoramic shot of our Salesian community gathered at Girard House.

***

From the archives: Founding Sisters "bond" with community members.

1989: Founding Sisters “bond” with local members of the police force.

On September 29, 1989, Sisters Mary Margaret, Karen and Mary Virginia said tearful good byes to their beloved St. Louis Visitation to come to establish, with Sr. Mary Frances, the Visitation Monastery of Minneapolis.

“Directed by the Holy Spirit through the ten years of discernment that preceded this foundation, we came with no other plan than to be faithful to our monastic way of life, which is centered on prayer and community, and to welcome and listen to those who came to our door. (Jesus promised us He would be there!) By faithfully listening to our neighbors, our agenda began to gradually unfold.”
- S. Mary Frances reflects on the founding of the monastery in our fall 2013 newsletter

Fr. Mike Newman, OSFS, presides at our Foundation Day mass with guests from our Visitation and Salesian Communities across the United States.

Fr. Mike Newman, OSFS, presides at our Foundation Day mass with guests from our Visitation and Salesian Communities across the United States.

On October 2, 1989Feast of the Guardian Angels,  Archbishop John R. Roach commissioned the Sisters to bring the gentle, non-violent charism of their founders to this inner city community. In his words, “I am happy I am sending the angels with you!.”

 

Click here to read more about the “Quarter-Century Marking”  of our northside ministry of prayer and presence: Fall 2013 Newsletter

 

Click here to see more photos from today’s Foundation Day Mass. 

Salesian Second Mondays Begin! This Year’s Theme: “Holiness is for Everyone”

On Monday, September 8, 2014, the Sisters and Visitation Companion Coordinator Jody Johnson convened our annual Salesian Second Monday series. This monthly event runs from September through April and includes a light pot luck supper and fellowship; followed by guided conversation around a topic related to Salesian Spirituality; and closes with Night Prayer. This year’s theme is “Holiness is for Everyone.” All are welcome!

Drawing from the Vatican II emphasis on the laity, as well as the writings of St. Francis de Sales, we are considering what it means to be holy in any walk of life. We reflect on how Salesian virtues may be expressed in different kinds of vocations.

To kick off the season focusing on (what the Church calls) the “universal call to holiness“, each Visitation Sister shared from her life, offering us some grounding insights on this theme.

Click to hear Visitation Sister Suzanne Homeyer offer a few stories that illustrate holiness.
To watch more of the Sisters reflecting on this theme of “Holiness is for Everyone”, tune into our Visitation Monastery YouTube Channel.

Remaining Salesian Second Monday Dates:

Monday, October 13, 2014
Monday, November 10, 2014
Monday, January 12, 2015
Monday, February 9, 2015
Monday, March 9, 2015
Monday, April 13, 2015

Join us!