Good Friday Reflection by S. Mary Frances Reis

by S. Mary Frances Reis, VHM

Isaiah 52:13-15; 53: 1-12

Suffering Servant, Donald Jackson, Copyright 2005, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota USA. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Suffering Servant, Donald Jackson, Copyright 2005, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota USA. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

A Blessed Good Friday of the Lord’s Passion.

This is the day to gaze on Love—a day, in the words of the Palmist, to “Be still and know that I am God” (Ps.46:11). What other stance can we take before this ancient text attributed to an anonymous poet who prophesied the fate of the Servant of God? Despised, discounted, and erased, the Suffering Servant descends into a terrifying darkness depicted in this illumination by ominous storm clouds. Yet, one cannot be with this text without hope. From the very first verse we hear, “See my Servant shall prosper; he shall be raised high and greatly exalted” (Is. 52:13). We are encouraged to hold the entire Paschal Mystery of suffering and triumph here—yes, even as we behold the Crucified One. This great messianic oracle is fulfilled in the passion, death and resurrection of Jesus. Be still, and gaze on the Love that from all eternity is poured out for us. Hold the Mystery.

Where is the Suffering Servant to be found today? In Flint, Michigan? In African American teens fearing to be shot by the police? In refugees in search of home? 

Living in a world where countless people feel despised, discounted, and erased, we pray for the grace to hold hope for them. From ancient times, God’s revealed word calls us to hold the entirety of this Mystery as one. With words of mercy, Pope Francis calls us to behold the Suffering Servant in our brothers and sisters who are in anguish: “Jesus invites us to behold these wounds. Through these wounds, as in a light- filled opening, we can see the entire Mystery of Christ and of God, filled with compassion for the weak and the suffering” (2015 Divine Sunday Homily).

Gaze on the emaciated figure with his back to the viewer and holding his head. He appears to be confined to a cell of some sort, surrounded by a fiery, terrifying darkness. Yet he is standing and at gazing at the illuminated cross. The Mystery of suffering and glorification is here.

Where is the Suffering Servant to be found today? In Flint, Michigan? In African American teens fearing to be shot by the police? In refugees in search of home? In immigrants living in fear of deportation? In the homeless and the hungry? Am I being called to enter the terrible darkness with them and carry the Illuminated cross to the suffering? Can I hold the entire Mystery for and with them?

Gaze into the wounds of the immigrant, the homeless, men, women and children poisoned by the water they drink,

Gaze, and you will learn the Mystery of dying and rising.

Gaze, “Be still and know that I am God.”

Mary Frances Reis, VHM is a member of the Visitation Monastery of Minneapolis. She and her community are engaged in contemplative prayer and non-violent presence in North Minneapolis. She is an alumna of Saint John’s School of Theology and Seminary.

This piece is re-printed here with permission. It runs concurrently at the Seeing the Word blog, published by St. John’s School of Theology.

Youth in Theology and Ministry Summer Institute 2015

 

YTM logo

Join us in celebrating the young people and their mentors in this summer’s 2015 Youth in Theology and Ministry (YTM) Institute. We are thrilled to be able to support our friends Alma, Eiler and Jessica as participants in this two year program.

The 2015 Summer Institute crew!

The 2015 Summer Institute crew!

YTM’s mission is to engage and develop Catholic young people and their adult mentors to be vibrant leaders in their faith journey and vocational call.

S. Katherine Mullin says about this program: “The Catholic theology that these young people hear is straight out of the book of Pope Francis!  I can attest to the fact that, at least the ones who I know, are excited about their faith -and living it!”

She also speaks of how impressive the young people’s service projects have been. She writes enthusiastically on our Facebook page: “Now Ascension Church has a renewed teen group! A shout out to Alma, Elier and Jessica!”

To read more about the mission and program of Youth in Theology and Ministry, visit their webpage at St. John’s School of Theology website.

“Praise of Wisdom” — Celebrating the Feminine Form in Scripture

Corein Brown

Corein Brown

This Easter season, Seeing the Word at Saint John’s School of Theology·Seminary is reflecting on the faces of women illuminated in The Saint John’s Bible. These often overlooked Biblical women exhibit remarkable faith, courage, and love.

As I welcome my stretch marks, I cannot help but see them in this illumination and wonder what Wisdom, this female servant of God, might have to say to all of us women, and our ever shifting and expanding bodies.”

Corein Brown

This week our friend Corein Brown, graduate of Saint John’s School of Theology·Seminary and Research and Communications Associate for the Collegeville Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research, shares a reflection on recognizing the dignity and wisdom of women, worthy of entering deeply into a relationship with God, knowing that it will stretch them as it brings new life. (Sirach 24)

We hope you enjoy this audio and visual reflection as much as we did!

Seeing the Faces of Women – Seeing the Word & The Saint John’s Bible – Praise of Wisdom from Web Coordinator on Vimeo.