We are taking Visitation Volunteer Applications!

VIP Promo VistoryAre you a young adult considering life after graduation? Does the idea of service and prayer, in the heart of the city, bring something alive in you? Are you called to explore your spirituality and be part of a social justice movement? Consider joining us, the Visitation Sisters, for a year of service, study and prayer as a Visitation Intern in north Minneapolis. We are taking applications now for September, 2017.

 

To hear more about the program, tune in to VIP Anna Dourgarian reflecting on her year with the Visitation Sisters in north Minneapolis.

Join us for “Miss Representation” – Tuesday, November 13, 6pm at St. Jane House

Kelly Schumacher Fuller

Kelly Schumacher Fuller

From Kelly Schumacher Fuller, “Movies with Jane” Series Coordinator

You’re invited to St. Jane House on Tuesday, November 13th for a screening of “Miss Representation,” a documentary which explores how the media and advertising grossly distorts who girls and women are, their sense of themselves, mens’ perceptions of who they are, and ultimately contributes to the under-representation of women in leadership roles in our country and world.

This is the next in our series, “Movies with Jane” featuring thought provoking films that inspire and/or challenge us to become better people!

MOVIES WITH JANE
6:00pm – Doors open to St. Jane House, 1403 Emerson Ave N

6:30pm – Film begins, followed by discussion

Limited to 20 people.
RSVP at the St. Jane House Facebook page, or to kelly.schumacher@gmail.com
When we hit capacity we will start a waiting list.

Newest Miss Representation Trailer (2011 Sundance Film Festival Official Selection) from Miss Representation on Vimeo.

About the film:

Like drawing back a curtain to let bright light stream in, Miss Representation uncovers a glaring reality we live with every day but fail to see. Written and directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, the film exposes how mainstream media contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America. The film challenges the media’s limited and often disparaging portrayals of women and girls, which make it difficult for women to achieve leadership positions and for the average woman to feel powerful herself.

In a society where media is the most persuasive force shaping cultural norms, the collective message that our young women and men overwhelmingly receive is that a woman’s value and power lie in her youth, beauty, and sexuality, and not in her capacity as a leader. While women have made great strides in leadership over the past few decades, the United States is still 90th in the world for women in national legislatures, women hold only 3% of clout positions in mainstream media, and 65% of women and girls have disordered eating behaviors.

Stories from teenage girls and provocative interviews with politicians, journalists, entertainers, activists and academics, like Condoleezza Rice, Nancy Pelosi, Katie Couric, Rachel Maddow, Margaret Cho, Rosario Dawson and Gloria Steinem build momentum as Miss Representation accumulates startling facts and statistics that will leave the audience shaken and armed with a new perspective.

Join us for “The Line” Tuesday, 10/23, 6pm!

Kelly Schumacher Fuller

Kelly Schumacher Fuller

From Kelly Schumacher Fuller, “Movies with Jane” Series Coordinator

Join us at St. Jane House on Tuesday, October 23rd for a screening of The Line, a new documentary chronicling the face of poverty in America. This is the next in our series, “Movies with Jane” featuring thought provoking films that inspire and/or challenge us to become better people!

MOVIES WITH JANE
6:00pm – Doors open to St. Jane House, 1403 Emerson Ave N

6:30pm – Film begins, followed by discussion

Limited to 20 people. RSVP at the St. Jane House Facebook page, or to kelly.schumacher@gmail.com
When we hit capacity we will start a waiting list.


About the Film:
From Emmy Award-winning producer Linda Midgett, The Line is a groundbreaking documentary chronicling the new face of poverty in America. As Sojourners CEO Jim Wallis puts it, “more and more of our friends are in poverty — in the pews, in our workplaces — through no fault of their own, and they are slipping below the poverty level.”

In the Chicago suburbs, a single dad was laid off from his bank and is now a regular at the local food pantry, trying to make it by with three kids.

On Chicago’s west side, deep poverty creates a culture of violence and hopelessness.

On the Gulf Coast, a fisherman struggles post-BP oil spill and Hurricane Katrina because environmental crises mean the loss of his livelihood.

In North Carolina, we see that hard work and determination don’t always mean success.

What does this mean for the future of our country? How do real-life stories change the narrative about poverty?

What can we do about it?